““The chapters of ‘Sunlight on Broken Stones’ assigned to me were astonishing. Written from the perspective of Cirilo, we are taken through his reflections of ‘The Trilogy.’ We find him contemplating the future of the Filipino, particularly pertaining to divisions between the rich and the poor,
this economic divide. He expounds on the true beauty of having little and the senselessness of having too much. Through poetry, he demonstrates in many ways how lack completes life. To lack is to truly understand the value of having. He compares the desires of those who have disgraced the Philippines to the wealthy tycoons of today, who constantly fight to earn riches, taking from those in much greater need. It is in his final book that Cirilo calls for action, urging people to act in order to make a better life for everyone. He calls for one that not only releases the poor from their oppression but a life that gifts everyone with its fullness, the variety of emotional experiences.”

AARON YU

Portrait by Kevin Nuñez

Reading Cirilo Bautista’s texts is a dream for anyone who loves to indulge in poetic imagery. His poetry on ‘The Archipelago,’ in ‘Telex Moon’ and ‘Sunlight on Broken Stones’ attempts a fresh take on history, one that is reimagined
through contemporary eyes.

It was very intriguing to see Cirilo take on roles theatrically, like characters in a play. Though his style and favorite analogies remained, he managed to retain
the illusion of his portrayals. I found that pleasing.

As I was reading on Cirilo Bautista, I noticed the importance of his persona to each portrayal of characters in his books. Cirilo had the tendency to highlight details
that reflected himself in each character, which in turn made his writing more emotionally persuasive of its message. Such was the case when he wrote
about feelings of distance, love, and isolation.
 

Chapters XXVII-XXII of Sunlight on Broken Stones was astonishing. Written from
the perspective of Cirilo himself, we are taken through his reflections
on his preceding books of the Trilogy. We find him contemplating the future
of the Filipino people, particularly with regards to divisions among the rich
and the poor, the economic divide. He expounds on the true beauty of having
little and the senselessness of having too much.

As one of the main focal points of the House of Words, viewed from the entry of the exhibit, this stanza seeks to awaken the advocate that exists inside each
and every Benildean, embedded deep within their morality and identity. The piece asks the wealthy readers to open their eyes and hearts to those in need.
Poverty is real whether we choose to believe it or not, and only together as a nation will we truly find change.

With these lines, Cirilo Bautista closes the entire ‘Trilogy of Saint Lazarus’,
making it the perfect piece to conclude the book.
It is Cirilo’s message to our generation.

In his final book, Cirilo calls for action, urging people to act to make a better life for everyone, one that not only releases the poor from oppression, but also gifts everyone
the fullness of life and the variety of emotional experiences. To lack, is to truly understand the value of having.

I would want others to know Cirilo for the color he brings to his own perspectives as much as he would his portrayals, regardless of it’s far footing in the past.
How he brings it to life with emotions. With his work you don’t just read, but you think and feel the lives he wrote.

Writing is in everyone. It initially exists within us all as a thought through sentences, feelings, emotions, our ideals. Writing is merely our minds and our hearts intertwined
on a page that has always found a way to extend beyond the ink and paper. Writing has the ability to take you back to moments much like a time-capsule.
It has the capability to preserve every bit of spirit of a moment, capturing better than a camera, engraves far deeply than sight. Cirilo was an artist who lived in this paradigm long enough to see patterns in every moment. He had an obscurely deep level of empathy that drove him to connect with minds from centuries before. How? I don’t know,
but perhaps history precedes in us all; and it is by digging within do we find the key to uncharted destinations in the mind, where we are limitless; boundless of time.